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Stitt Set This Program Back for Years

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  • #61
    Originally posted by growler View Post
    I continue to be amused by the number of Griz fans, like 24, who supposedly know football, and who support Stitt. 24 claims to have been a long-time defensive coach, yet he gives Stitt a free pass on both understanding that defense wins the big games, and in recruiting defensive players in lieu of wasting 20 valuable scholarships on WRs so he can run his stupid offense! 24 compounds his lack of understanding of how to field a dominant team by stating that Stitt's offense was really a very good one...... even though every football mind knows that the ability to run the ball is essential to winning against great defensive opponents. Stitt thought that his gimmicky offense that worked at Mines, where he bragged about having a 1000-yard rusher, would translate to the FCS level. Uh, not so much!

    I still remember attending 3 "closed" fall practices last August in which Stitt never ONCE even paid attention to what was happening on the defensive side of the 50-yard line during drills and practice! NOT ONCE during three practices! That shows how much he stressed defense!
    While I never was a big fan of Stitt, I will say that his offense in the third year did put up enough points that we should’ve won most of the games we played. My problems with his coaching were lack of mental & physical toughness in his players and his almost flippant disregard for defense or special teams. Those issues well not be issues with the current staff.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by Robgriz View Post

      While I never was a big fan of Stitt, I will say that his offense in the third year did put up enough points that we should’ve won most of the games we played. My problems with his coaching were lack of mental & physical toughness in his players and his almost flippant disregard for defense or special teams. Those issues well not be issues with the current staff.
      Rob, let's have a drink together when I get to Missoula in June. Or, if you drive, i'll buy dinner at Barclays. Give me a way to contact you with a PM.

      One comment about your point that Stitt's offense scored enough points to win most games his third year. IMO, it is not as simple as how many points a team scores. There are other "game management" factors which are very important. When a team can not run the ball effectively, they pass the ball so often that they either lengthen the game, or score quickly, which tends to give their opponents more possessions than a team who can eat clock with an effective running game. EWU and NAU are examples of teams who have scoring drives that eat very little time. Thus, they have lots of high-scoring games because the defense spends so much time on the field. A balanced run/pass offense has fewer possessions, and longer drives. If that team also has a great defense, the number of possessions by the opponent is limited. Balance is the formula for success. Bobby's Griz teams always had it. Stitt's never did.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by growler View Post

        Rob, let's have a drink together when I get to Missoula in June. Or, if you drive, i'll buy dinner at Barclays. Give me a way to contact you with a PM.

        One comment about your point that Stitt's offense scored enough points to win most games his third year. IMO, it is not as simple as how many points a team scores. There are other "game management" factors which are very important. When a team can not run the ball effectively, they pass the ball so often that they either lengthen the game, or score quickly, which tends to give their opponents more possessions than a team who can eat clock with an effective running game. EWU and NAU are examples of teams who have scoring drives that eat very little time. Thus, they have lots of high-scoring games because the defense spends so much time on the field. A balanced run/pass offense has fewer possessions, and longer drives. If that team also has a great defense, the number of possessions by the opponent is limited. Balance is the formula for success. Bobby's Griz teams always had it. Stitt's never did.
        I agree totally. My point was that I just cannot believe a guy who barely acknowledges the existence of defense or special teams EVER became head coach at the University of Montana. If he would have he’d have won a lot more games than he did. Mind boggling.
        Last edited by Robgriz; 04-20-2018, 11:49 AM.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by Robgriz View Post

          I agree totally. My point was that I just cannot believe a guy who barely acknowledges the existence of defense or special teams EVER became head coach at the University of Montana. If he would have he’d have won a lot more games than he did. Mind boggling.
          I think Stitt underestimated the huge difference between Div.II football and FCS football. I have a good buddy who lives in my Arizona neighborhood in the winter, but lives in Laramie, WY the rest of the year and is a huge Wyoming booster. He knows football too. He loved Joe Glenn during his tenure as Wyoming's head coach, and became good friends and golfing buddies with Joe. But, he thinks that Joe had a difficult time adjusting to the superior level of high school talent needed to recruit to be successful as a FBS coach. He said that Glenn tended to sign Big Sky level players, and very few kids that were FBS level. I think this happens to a lot of head coaches who move up to a high level of football. It also happens to hot-shot college coaches who move up to head NFL jobs. Chip Kelly, Steve Spurrier, Nick Sabin, and Lou Holtz all found out the huge difference in coaching FBS football and NFL football.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by growler View Post

            I think Stitt underestimated the huge difference between Div.II football and FCS football. I have a good buddy who lives in my Arizona neighborhood in the winter, but lives in Laramie, WY the rest of the year and is a huge Wyoming booster. He knows football too. He loved Joe Glenn during his tenure as Wyoming's head coach, and became good friends and golfing buddies with Joe. But, he thinks that Joe had a difficult time adjusting to the superior level of high school talent needed to recruit to be successful as a FBS coach. He said that Glenn tended to sign Big Sky level players, and very few kids that were FBS level. I think this happens to a lot of head coaches who move up to a high level of football. It also happens to hot-shot college coaches who move up to head NFL jobs. Chip Kelly, Steve Spurrier, Nick Sabin, and Lou Holtz all found out the huge difference in coaching FBS football and NFL football.
            The strange thing about your neighbor's thoughts is that while he's a lot right, Joe put a ton of guys in the NFL in his time in Laramie. He had really good starters, but nothing for depth behind them. Some of his last classes, in fact, still have guys playing in the NFL. Joe's biggest plus was getting the IPF built.. guy raised a ton of money.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by growler View Post

              Rob, let's have a drink together when I get to Missoula in June. Or, if you drive, i'll buy dinner at Barclays. Give me a way to contact you with a PM.

              One comment about your point that Stitt's offense scored enough points to win most games his third year. IMO, it is not as simple as how many points a team scores. There are other "game management" factors which are very important. When a team can not run the ball effectively, they pass the ball so often that they either lengthen the game, or score quickly, which tends to give their opponents more possessions than a team who can eat clock with an effective running game. EWU and NAU are examples of teams who have scoring drives that eat very little time. Thus, they have lots of high-scoring games because the defense spends so much time on the field. A balanced run/pass offense has fewer possessions, and longer drives. If that team also has a great defense, the number of possessions by the opponent is limited. Balance is the formula for success. Bobby's Griz teams always had it. Stitt's never did.
              I PM’d you.

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              • #67
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